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ADVANTAGES. 



The PriucipaVs aud Commandant's families reside at the Acad- 
emy, also four Professors. Parents may rest assured that their 
boys will have the best of care and guidance, with a good home 
influence such as is not obtained at Academies of this character. 
Cadets are received into our families and are required to attend 
church with us on the Sabbath and Bible class in the afternoon, 
and at all times are under a good Christian influence. 

Another feature we wish to present is, that we limit the num- 
ber of Cadets to forty and under no consideration will any more be 
received at the Academy ; and with four resident Professors we 
know we can do justice to each Cadet. 

The Cadets have good rooms (not dormitories), well furnished 
and carpeted, and many advantages that other schools do not pre- 
sent. 

The grounds, consisting of twenty acres, are the finest Academy 
grounds in this country. 

The pupils will be permitted a free expression of their tli oughts 
and feelings, by letters to their parents, to whom they are expected 
to write at least every two weeks. Parents are requested to com- 
municate freely with the Commandant on all matters concerning 
their sons at school, and especially on the subject of any complaint 
made by them, that if reasonable, it may be immediately attended to, 
and if not well founded, it may be explained. 

The Cadets associate together in the Academy and on its 
grounds, and are not to leave them at any time without special j)er- 
mission. When absent on leave, they are limited to a special time, 
at which they are to return and rej)ort themselves to the command- 
ant. 

It is intended to combine strict discipline with easy and instruc- 
tive intercourse between teachers and pupils, so as to secure at the 
same time the family influence on the affections, and the eflQciency 
of system aud order. 

Gentlemanly conduct and respect aud obedience to teachers 
and school regulations will be exj^ected and required. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



OF THE- 





a \/r '^. 






43111 



( FORMERLY IMMANUEL HALL.) 



^ m 12.2^1^^ 



( MEAR CHICAGO. 



Nmnher of Cadets Limited to J^O. 



Fottr Resident Professors. 



COMMENCING THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1878. 



FOR RESIDENT CADETS ONLY. 



Oflace, 169 Madison St., Room 3, Chicago, 111. 

878-79 



(>— 3=r- 



CAPT. J. CLAUDE HILL, Commandant, 
Civil and Military Engineering and Instructor in Tactics. 

COL. G. S. HOLLISTER, A. M., Graduate U.S. Military Academy, 
Prof, of Mathematics, Elocution., and the Natural Sciences. 

R. "WALDMEYER, A. M., (Native German), 
Erof. of Latin, Greek, German and French Languages. 

LOUIS A. HILL, 

Prof, of Penmanship and Practical Book-keeping. 

MISS SOPHIA SMITH, 
Teacher of Music and Voice Culture. 

M. H. HOLMES, 

Prof, of Painting and Drawing. 

D. E. SHAW, 

Prof, of Dancing and Drawing-room Etiquette. 

DR. J. P. MILLS, 

Physician. 

MRS. J. C. HILL, 
Matron. 



MaLITAKY iS;;TArr. 



Capt. J. Claude Hill, 

Commandant of Cadets. 
Chas. H. Starkel, 

First Lieidenant. 

G. G. Garrettson, 

Second Lieidenant. 

J. F. Horst, 

Orderly Sergeant. 

Willie Snyder, 

Second Sergeant. 

W. H. Weld, 

First Corporal. 



Dr. J. P. Mills, 

Surgeon. 

Joseph Kaiser, 

First Lieutenant. 

J. F. Davenport, 

Quartermaster. 

J. AV. Horst, 

Color Sergeant. 

D. Westfield, 

Third Sergeant. 

A. Boswortb, 

Fourth Sergeant. 



Academy Band. 



J. A. Kaiser, 

Drum Major. 

Chas. J. Stine, Tenor. 

W. T. Mitchell, Zfeno?'. \ Drummers. 

L. Nichols, Base 

W. H. Weld. ) 



Chas. Laeuffert, 

Fife Major. 



Wm. Horst. j 



Fifers. 



C. H. STARKEL Illinois. 

J. A. KAISER 

G. G. GARRETTSON Iowa. 

J. F. DAVENPORT Illinois. 

W. T. MITCHELL 

C. J. STINE 

WILLIE SNYDER 

J. F. HORST ^ Missouri. 

J. W. HORST 

CLARENCE GREEN 

O. E. FORSTER 

CHARLES LAUEFFERT Illinois. 

H. CLAY PYLE 

LEWIS NICHOLS 

DANIEL WESTFIELD 

FERDINAND HEIM 

WM. WELD Wisconsin. 

AMOS BOSWORTH Illinois. 

J. B. HERRICK 

STANTON HOLLISTER 

FREDDIE HOLLISTER 

J. B. TARR Pennsylvania. 

D. J. MILLER Indiana. 

G. D. RICE Illinois. 

HENRY CHAMBERS Missouri. 

G. W. THOMPSON Indiana. 

H. RIDGWAY' Illinois. 

C. A. SAGER " 



IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY. 



G^^iM^^FMM^ 



GEO. H. KIXZIE Illinois. 

CHAS. M. HIGINSOX 

JOHN T. XICKERSON 

SIMEON L. ROYCE 

CHAS. GOODMAN, JR 

HOBART K. B.\ILE\' Indiana. 

HIRAM Ct. PORTER Illinois. 

ROB'T L. ALLEN 

GEO. B. NORTON 

A. LE GRAND PIERCE Michigan. 

PHILIP S. WOOD Illinois. 

EDWARD C. WOOD 

JOHN KELLOGG 

EDWIN S. DAY 

ISAAC SHERWOOD, JR 

HENRY' L. BARNETT 

GEO. McDonnell 

GEO. D. FAROVID 

JULIUS A. BOYER 

GEO. D. BALDWIN 

ASA P. BALDWIN 

JAMES C. WATKINS Michigan, 

CHAS. J. KENEDALL 

HENRY' E. MOORE Illinois. 

EDWARD W. CANFIELD 

WM. B. SMITH 

WILBRAY' J. THOMPSON 

JAMES DUNCAN SCOTT 

AVM. S. RANDOLPH Missouri. 

JACOB NELSON Illinois. 

GEO, P. GARDNER 

OSCAR T. COOK 

LEWIS C. BESLEY' 

HENRY' R. CANFIELD ^ 

WILBY P. SWELL 

RICHARD A. SWELL 

FLOROMOND W. CROUKHITE 

GEO. W. PETTIT 

EDWIN D. BECKER 

CHAS. D. CONE 

FRANK L. EASTMAN 

EDWARD A. ALLEN 

N. FRANK COOKE 

FKANK S. BROWNELL 

WALTER S. FASSET 

WM. S. SCHUFELT Michigan. 

FREDERICK A. SHAW Illinois. 

THEO. F. VAN WAGENEN 

EDWIN TAGGART 

CHAS. B. STAPLES 

CHAS. C. ADSIT 

GEO. A. FLAGG 

ALBERT LA F. BROWN 

EDWARD C.MARTIN Wisconsin. 

GUY'S. SEA Illinois. 

EDGAR SNYDER 

WM. H. GANOE Michigan. 

HARRY' K. HINSDALE Illinois. 





IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY. 7 


ADOLPHUS F. MESERVEY'-. .... 




NEWTOX E. MINOR. . .. 




CLEMENT F. BLANCHET 

CHAS. HOFFMAN, JR 

WM. M. CHASE - . 


Minnesota. 

Illinois. 


FRANK L. CHASE 

FRANK SWAIN . . __ .. __ 


ALISON E. HOSIER 

WM. J. JONES .. - 


Missouri. 


BENJ. L. MANSFIELD ...._-.. 


FRANK PHINNY' .... 


WM. H.MITCHELL . 


AUGUSTINE H. HOOD 

ELWARD A. STONEHILL . . 


DELBERT E. JOHNSON . . . . 


GEO. S.JOHNSON... . .. 


CHAS. J. BATTEN ... ...... 


CHAS. G. BICKERDIKE-. „ 


NATHAN R. CHADWICK 

PHILIP N. EARL 

FRANK S. FRACKER 

WM. A.SKINPLE . . . „ 


Indiana. 

Wisconsin. 

Iowa. 

Illinois 


GEO. H. BEAN . 


FRED. C. MERRILL 

NORMAN J. CARY'. 


GEO. WANLESS ... 


folorarlo 1 


CHAS. WANLESS . " 


FRANK WANLESS. . _ .. . _ 


ALBERT B. ELLITHORP 

AUGUSTUS A. BLACK 

CHAS. E. FRANKENTHAL 

WM. W. CONE -. . - 


Illinois. 

Pennsylvania. 

Illinois, 


ROSWELL P. SHERWOOD 

GEO. DINGEE . . 


Kansas. 

-. Illinois. 


WM. B. ALLEN - _. . . - " ! 1 


BENJ. C. WILSON 

CHESTER S. GURNEY" 

CHAS. D. SOMERS. .. 


Kansas. 

Illinois. 


RICHARD A. TARTLE. . ... . . . " 


FRANK P. RAY' . 


RODNEY' KNIGHT SHERWIN 

FRED W. BRY'AN 


Wisconsin . 


HENRY' SCHUTTLER ... . " 


WM. H. FLINT .... _ -. 


SAMUEL OWEN. ....... ..... 


HORACE W. OWEN . _ " 


RICHARD H. GARDNER. 


FRANCIS C. HARRINGTON . . ... 


JOSHUA BARNEY' 


FRED. WM. SANGER 


HENRY' L. MILLER 

ORLANDO P. KEITH 

CHAS. S. DELAY' 


Michigan. 

Illinois. 


GROSVENOR A. SHINN . . . " 


W. FRANK BEMIS . . " 


ROBERT EMPSON. - 


WALTER P. SCHOFIELD 

RICHARD L. WILSON 

JOHN H. TURNER 


Georgia. 

Illinois. 


IRVING B. BROWER ' 


Nfiw York- 







IRVING MILITARY ACADEINIV 



JAMES R. HFMPHREYVILLE Illinois. 

LOARNI E. BALDWIN . Massachusetts. 

SILAS W. DOG LITTLE Wisconsin. 

CHAS. H. TYRRELL Wisconsin. 

GEO. "W. COWLES Alabama. 

JAMES E. FARRELL Illinois. 

CHAS. H. CROUKHITE Iowa. 

WM. A. CO\VLES Alabama. 

EUGEXE F. HAMMOND Illinois. 

CHAS, W. ANDRE^VS, JR - 

AVM. L. CHURCH, JR 

WM. M. JARVIS 

WM. C. MAGILL 

NATHANAEL E. MAGILL 

FRANK E. SHINN 

WILLIE B. HAWKINS 

WM. A. SMALL 

WM. F. JONES 

WM. G. KAY 

HERMANN M. C-tREEN 

GEO. P. SCRIVEN 

CHAS. H. ANDREWS Missouri. 

ALBERT H.HILL Indiana. 

W. S. HILL 

ALBERT J. SOMERS Illinois. 

ROBERT E.YOUNG Wisconsin 

J, WEST HART Indiana. 

MILTON R. HART 

CONRAD LANBUREY'ER Illinois. 

ARTHUR A. DUCAT 

CHAS. F. EVERITT 

FRANK H. FOLLANSBEE 

GEO. G. HOLT 

WM. HENRY SOMERS 

AUGUSTUS D. SMITH 

WILLIE F. WALLACE 

WILLIE CLARK 

GILBERT B. H.ARRIS 

WM. F. McCRAKEN California. 

FRANK HARRIS PEAK Michigan. 

CHAS. P. BELL Ulonois. 

WM. R. APPLEBY" 

JOHN C. PARKS 

WHITBY' F. HALL 

ADAM F. KEEON 

HERBERT C. CHASE 

CHAS. LANBINEBER 

JOHN P. RENOLDS 

JAMES L. DALL 

GUY SAWEY 

EDWARD B. CAMBLOS 

FRANK CAMBLOS 

RICHARD BICKERDIKE 



IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY, 



Location and Buildings. 

Immanuel Hall, was founded A. T>. 1863, by the Rev. Roswell 
Park, D. D. It is situated in the Township of Lake View, six miles 
Northward from Clark Street Bridge, in Chicago, and one mile due 
West from the gate of Graceland Cemetery, to which the Irving 
Park Boulevard is now opened and in good condition. It is accessi- 
ble by private conveyance via Wells Street and Lincoln Avenue, or 
around by Graceland. The Horse Cars on North Clark Street run 
in connection with a Dummy car to Graceland, whence it is an 
easy walk to the Academy. The accommodation trains on the 
Milwaukee Railroad, stop at Academy Station, one-half mile from 
the Academy. See Time Table on last page. 

The grounds consist of 20 acres, part grove and part lawn, and 
are laid out with much care and taste, and its surroundings are 
beautiful. Two miles west is one of Chicago's most flourishing 
suburban towns, Irving Park ; two miles east Lake Michigan ; two 
miles and one-half southeast, Lincoln Park, Chicago ; and one mile 
northeast another beautiful suburb, Ravenswood. The land is high 
and dry and a heavy growth of timber covers the ground in vicinity 
of the Academy for miles, and it is unquestionably the most beautiful 
and healthful location near Chicago. 

The Academy buildings are built of Milwaukee Brick and are 
in good repair, and were constructed with entire reference to the 
convenience and comfort of cadets. The campus, embracing 20 acres, 
affords a superior jDlace for drill and physical recreation, producing 
feelings of cheerfulness and contentment. 

The Ground Floor of the Academy consists of a Dining Hall, 
Kitchen, Laundry, Bath Rooms, Wash Rooms, Gymnasium, Store 
Rooms, and Sleeping Rooms for servants. 

The Second Floor consists of a Recej^tion Hall and Parlors, 
Library and Reading Room, Professors' and Matron's Rooms, also 
Cadets' Rooms {not dormitories.) 

The Third Floor consists of Cadets' and otficers' sleeping Rooms, 
large, airy and well-ventilated. 

NOTE.— W^e wish parents and patrons to understand that we have no con- 
tracted dormitories, but large, well-ventilated rooms, spring beds, hair mat- 
trasses. 

The Gymnasium 

Is a large, well ventilated room fitted up with all the paraphernalia 
of a Gymnasium. 

The School Room. 

The School Room and Drill Hall connects with the main build- 
ing by a covered passage-way. In the school Room proper we 
purpose to show the improvement which can be made by earnest 
work in mental culture, teaching the cadets to think for themselves, 
that when they become men they may act for themselves, and be 
useful citizens in any community. 



IRVING ]MIL1TARY ACADEMY. 



The Drill Hall. 

The Drill Hall is directly over the School and Recitation rooms, 
and is a hu-ge, commodious Hall 40 x 60 feet, and without doubt is 
the fiue.^t Drill Room in any school of the kind west of New York. 
Connected with the Hall is the Quartermaster's Department and 
Armory. 

Design and Character. 

In this institution boys are furnished with a thorough mental, 
moral and physical training. To accomplish this, the Commadant is 
assisted by a corps of experienced and competent Professors, who 
are thoroughly enlisted in the cause of education and alive to the 
several obligations resting upon them. 

Thoroughness is a marked characteristic in each department. 
Xo eflbrt will be spared to make the instruction at the Academy 
apply to the practical, every-day life of the student, when he has 
gone out into the world to meet the realities of maturer years. 

It is designed in this institution to unite with mental and moral 
culture, thorough Military instruction, both theoretical and prac- 
tical. The physical exercise of the drill tends to develop a healthy 
and vigorous constitution. In all the routine of duties the cadets 
are subjected to a system of regulations calculated to make them 
prompt, systematic and gentlemanly. 

The Bible being God's "Rule of Right,'' it is the standard text 
book of morality in the institution. It will be the endeavor of the 
Commandant and Profossors,by means of familiar lectures and social 
intercourse (without sectarian bias,) to plant its ennobling prin- 
ciples in the hearts of the cadets entrusted to their care. 

We desire while training the mind to educate the heart, and 
with this purpose in view, we ask God's blessing upon our endeavors, 
and trust that we shall receive the earnest support and hearty co- 
operation of jDarents and patrons who desire to see their sons grow 
up wise, just and true men. 

INSTRUCTION. 

The Course of Instruction is suflflciently comprehensive to fit 
students for advanced classes in any of our leading colleges or scien- 
tific schools, or for the Military Academy at West Point, or the 
Xaval Academy at Annapolis, and for Practical and Commercial 
joursuits. 

Three Liberal Courses are in successful operation — Scientific, 
Classical and Commercial. If it is the desire of the parent, a cadet 
may take up only one of these, yet it is hoped that parents will 
allow their sons to complete the entire course of instruction before 
leaving the institution. 



IRVI.XG MILITARY ACADEMY. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

The Classical Course embraces the Latin and Greek Classics, 
and sucli other studies as are required to prepare young men thor- 
oughly for Harvard or Yale. 

Preparatory Course. 

Orthography Reading— History U. S. 

Penmanship, Arithmetic— both Mental and Written Geography 

and Map-drawing. 
English Grammar— Latin, optional. 
Modern Languages— optional. 

Scientific Course, 

FOUKTH CLASS. 

Mathematics — Algebra. 

Philosophy— Natural and Experimental. 

English Grammar and Analysis. 

American History. 

Early American Literature. 

Drawing— French, German Latin, optional. 

Etymological Exercises— Reading and Penmanship. 

Elocution— English Composition. 

THIRD CLASS. 

f Geometry. 

Mathematics. -| Trigonometry. 

I Line burveying. 

L Analytical Geometry. 
Chemistry. 
Rhetoric. 

English Literature. 

Drawing- French, German, optional, Latin, Greek, optional. 
Elocution and Composition. 

SECOND CLASS. 

{Descriptive Geometry. 
Calculus. 
Differential and Integral. 

Mechanics. { General Principles^ 

I Composition and Revolution of forces. 
Chemistry — Blow Pipe Analgus. 
Science of Government. 
Modern Languages, ojDtional. 
Latin and Green, oiDtional. 
Elocution and Computation. 

FIRST CLASS. 

Mathematic. j ISJiX'"'"^'""""- 

f Mechanics of Solids. 
Mechanics, j jMechanics of Fluids. 

i Motion of water in Pipes. 



IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY. 



Optics. 

f Theory, Roads, Bridges, Canals, Strength 
I of materials, &c. 
Civil EngiueeriDg. -J Practical Operations, Use of Level and 
I Theotlolite Leveling for Sections and 
L Working Drawings. 
Astronomy— Spherical. Appearances, Magnitudes, Distances of 

Heavenly Bodies, Latitude and Longitude. 
Chemistry— Humid Qualitative Analysis, Mineralogy, Geology. 
Elocution and Composition. 

Commercial or Business Department. 

Those who are able to accomplish more than is included in this 
course, will also be entered in other classes of the School; the follow 
ing being those selected as associate studies: 
The French and German Languages. 

Algebra. Natural Philosophy. 

Geometry. Chemistry. 

One or more of these may be taken in connection with the reg- 
ular 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

FIRST TERM. 

Daily Exercises in Penmanship. 
Book-keeping Commenced. 

Critteudon's Commercial Arithmetic to Dividends and Invest- 
ments. 
Business Correspondence. 

SECOND TERM. 

Penmanship. 

Book-keeping comi^leted. 

Commercial Arithmetic completed. 

Daily Exercises in Trial Balances; Annuities; Exchange; 
Averaging Accounts, etc. ; and Essays upon United States Bonds, 
Stocks, Real Estate Investments; Commercial Law. 

THIRD TERM. 

Mensuration ; The Mechanical Powers and other Calculations 
in Natural Science; The study of Business Forms and the use and 
meaning of Busindss Terms; the establishment of a Bank, also a 
Business Firm, and their management for a specified time ; The 
Constitution of the United States ; Commercial law relating to 
Agreement or Contract ; Sales ; Negotiable Paper ; Partnerships , 
Payment ; ^Mortgages ; Tender and Shipping. 

Exercises in Penmanship, Reading, Spelling and Defining, 
daily during the course. Regular weekly exercises in Composition 
and Declamation, throughout the entire course. 



IRVING illLITARY ACADEMY. I3 

Students in the Classical Course may jjursue one of the Modern 
Languages — Uerman or French— or any of the branches of Natural 
Science which are laid down in the regular English and Scientific 
Course. 

Military Instruction 

Here there are two departments — Theoretical and Practical. 
The former consists of the studies of the drills of the several corps 
of the army, strategy, field fortifieation, siege operations, construe 
tion of roads and bridges, and other branches of military engineer- 
ing. This course is pursued in the school room during the hours 
assigned for study. It is optional, and may be omitted at the re- 
quest of parents or guardians. 

The Practical consists of the drills in infantry and artillery 
tactics — the sword and bayonet exercises, guard duty, and so much 
of the actual field operations included in military engineering as 
the time of the cadets will permit. This course is attended to in the 
hours assigned for drill in the table of time, and all Cadets are re- 
quired to participate in it. 

Target Practice. 

There is a regular monthly Target Practice the last Saturday of 
each month, and an annual Target Shoot the last Saturday of the 
school year, for 

PRIZES 
consisting of first, second and third prizes. First prize, a gold 
badge for best shot. Second and third prizes, silver badges same 
pattern as gold badge. 

At last year's Target Shoot, G. G. Garretson, of Muscatine, la., 
carried off first prize ; J. F. Davenport, of Freeport, 111., second 
prize, and Lewis Nichols, of Lebanon, 111., third prize. 

Hospital. 

In cases of sickness more threatening than those light attacks of 
headache, etc., with which boys are occasionally visited, parents 
may rely upon the prompt attention of the surgeon or such other 
physician as the patron or Commandant may designate. Attentive 
and experienced nurses will do all that is j)ossible to relieve the 
patient. 

Matron. 

The Matron will have control of the household department, and 
will see that the Cadets are at all times well cared for, their clothing 
not misplaced and their rooms made comfortable and home-like. 
She will also see that their clothing is kept in repair. In case of 
sickness she will see that nothing is omitted that may be needed 
for their welfare and comfort. 

Wardrobe, Uniform, &c. 

The dress uniform of blue will be made and trimmed according 
o the pattern in the Academy. 

t 



14 IRVING .MILITARY ACADEMY. 

The cap will be made of blue cloth, according to the pattern in 
the Academy. 

The overcoat will be made of blue cloth, according to the pat- 
tern in the Academy. 

Every Cadet will be required to have one suit of uniform always 
in order. For undress, a uniform of gray, made and trimmed ac- 
cording to the pattern in the Academy, will be worn when off duty. 

In order to secure perfect uniformity and cheapness, all uniform 
clothing should be purchased of the tailors of the Academy. The 
regulation cap is procured at the Academy. 

Each Cadet should provide himself with the following articles : 

Three pairs of white cotton gloves for drill. 

Six white shirts, six white linen turn-over collars, six pairs of 
socks, three pairs of drawers. Three undershirts, two night shirts, 
six pocket handkerchiefs, one plated tea and desert spoon and one 
napkin ring ; one plated fork, four towels, four table napkins, three 
sheets, three pillow cases, one clothes bag, one comforter, two 
blankets, one pillow, one clothes brush, one hair brush and comb ! 
one tooth brush, one blacking brush with blacking, one paper of 
needles and assorted threads. 

Each article owened by Cadet must be marked, as far as prac- 
ticable, with owner's name in full ; o therwise the Commandant 
will not hold himself responsible for missing articles. 

Laundry. 

Each Cadet will be entitled to one dozen pieces per week ; addi- 
tional pieces will be charged for at the rate of 75 cents per dozen. 

Table of the Employment of Time. 

6 A. M Reveille. 

6:15 A. M Roll Call. 

6:15 to 7:15 Study. 

7:15 Breakfast. 

7. -4.5 Guard Mounting. 

8:30 to 12:15 P. M Study and Recitations. 

1 " Dinner. 

2 to 4:15 " Study and Recitations. 

4:30 to 5:30 " Drill and Dress Parade. 

6 " Supper. 

7 to 8 " Study. 

9 " Roll Call. 

9:15 " Taps. 

In the above Table it will be seen that eight hours per day are 
assigned for studies, one and one-half for drill, eight for sleep, and 
one and one-half for meals, leaving five hours for recreation or special 
duties. 

For Saturday — and Sunday of course — this table is changed, but 
all duties on every day are performed with the strictest regard to 
punctuality. 



IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY. I 5 

After Evening Roll Call the cadets will retire quietly to their 
sleeping apartments, where each, in his own appointed bed, may 
repose as undisturbed as at his own home. The regulation for cadet 
quarters enjoins perfect quietness from taps until reveille. No con- 
versation upon any subject whatever is permitted, excepting neces- 
sary communication to an officer of the Academy. To ensure this, 
the officer in charge will be present, and strictly enforce this regu- 
lation. 

The officer has a constant oversight of the cadets, and is respon- 
sible lor their good behavior during his tour of duty. 

This constant supervision of cadets will assure parents that no 
effort is spared to avoid the influences resulting from carelessness or 
defective discipline. 

Calendar. 

The Academic Year consists of one session, commencing on 
Thursday, Sept. 5th, 1878. 

Christmas Vacation commences Friday, December 20th, 1878, 
and ends January 3rd, 1879. 

Session ends Friday, June 13th, 1879. 

Closing Exercises at 10 A. M., on the last day of the session. 

Parents are earnestly requested to have their sous present on 
the first day of the session, and on the first day after the close of the 
Christmas vacation, as punctuality is of great importance. 

Every Cadet will be required to answer to the first roll call after 
each vacation, and failure to do so on their part, will be regarded as 
a want of punctuality and will be reprimanded as at any other 
period of the session. 

No cadet will be permitted to leave the Academy, excejDt by 
written permission of the Commandant. 

Absence from duty, on^ny account whatever, injures the stand- 
ing of cadets. 

Saturday is the only day assigned for parents and friends to 
visit cadets. Visiting the Academy on the Sabbath is positively 
prohibited. 

Financial. 

The charges i^er sessian are payable, one-half upon entering, the 
remainder on the second of January. 

Cadets entering after the second week of the session will be 
charged only from date of entrance ; one-half upon entering, the re- 
mainder on the second of January. 

Terms. 

Instruction in all branches taught in the English and Commer- 
cial course, board, washing, lights, fuel, etc., per annum, exclusive 
of vacation, ..------.. .$360.00 

Extra Charges. 

Music on Piano, per annum, ------- §75.00 

Use of Piano, " " 10.00 



1 6 IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY. 

Vocal Instruotiou, per anniui], 40.00 

Moderu Languages " " 40.00 

Drawiug, " " 20.00 

Paintiug, " " 70.00 

Dancing Lessons, '' " - - • 12.00 

Closing Exercises, $2.00. 
To those who prefer a stated sum $500.00 per annum will be 
charged ; and for it the pupil will be entiiled to all the advantages 
of the Institution, with /io extra charges. Books and Stationery 
extra. 

Notice. 

In entering a pupil, the engagement is distinctly understood to 
be for a School year, or to the close of the current School year, in 
June, and no one can be admitted for a shorter time. The same rule 
regulates every renew^al of the engagement. The arrangements of 
the school being made for the .year, render these conditions absolute- 
ly necessary. 

Text books and stationery are furnished, when required at the 
regular oooksellers' jDrices. 

X. B. — As the number of pupils is limited, and the api^lications 
usually exceed in number the vacant places, notice of removal must 
in all cases be given at the close of the current year, or the pupil 
will be considered as having entered for the next year. 

Vacancies generally occur at the close of the term in June, but 
applications should be made as far in advance of that time as possi- 
ble: and if by strangers, a proj^er introduction from some gentlemen 
already acquainted with the School will be required. Parents who 
desire the select character of the School to be maintained, will ap- 
preciate the necessity of this precaution. 

Pupils may be received at any time iij the term should a vacan- 
cy occur, and they will be charged for the rest of the School year ; 
but no deduction will be made for absence, or for the voluntary 
withdrawal of a pupil before the close of the year. 

Cadets are prohibited from Avearing any but the uniform dress 
prescribed by the institution. It is made after the Cadets' arrival 
and by the Academy tailor only, and at a much less figure than can 
be done elsewhere, 

Bills arising from medical attendance will be extra. Should 
sickness detain any cadet from the Academy longer than one month 
five dollars per week will be refunded. 

General Regulations. 

Things Required. 

Quick and willing obedience, gentlemanly conduct, studious- 
ness, honor, promptness, neatness of room, desk and person. In 
the school room, strict attention to your own business. In the 
ranks, hands at side, head erect, eyes front, and silence. To report 
immediately any damage done. 



irving military academy. 1 7 

Things Forbidden. 

To visit any Billiard Saloon or place where liquors are sold. To 
have in possession or use, cards, fire-arms or weapons. To borrow 
money. To force any Cadet into a game in which he does not de- 
sire to take part. To engage in boisterous play in any part of the 
building except the play-room. To cut or mark the buildings. To 
throw stones or sticks. To climb flag-staff or trees. To throw any- 
thing from windows. To converse in reading-room. Spitting or 
throwing anything upon floors. To communicate or have lights in 
dormitories after taps and before reveille. To exerciseiu gym- 
nasium or on play-ground in best suit. To address teacher or pupil 
in school session without obtaining permission by raising the hand. 
To have in school-room any book, paper or other article not pertain- 
ing to school duties. To have unmarked articles. 

Permission must be obtained from Commandant to visit the 
room of another Cadet, or to borrow or loan articles. To visit any 
resident of the village. To enter dining-room, kitchen, laundry, 
or wash-rooms. 

DisciPiiiNE. — The discipline of this institution is of a military 
kind, and violations of its rules and regulations render Cadets liable 
to extra duties, fatigue details, room arrests and close confinement. 
These punishments are firmly and impartially administered after 
each offense has been carefully examined or fully tried. The de- 
linquent has the privilege of explaining and defending his ease ; 
and there is preserved a full record of all delinquencies and punish- 
ments, open to the examination of patrons and visiting committees. 

This institution expects not only to make scholars of its Cadets, 
but to inculcate in them the principles of honor and integrity. ISTot 
alone to send out its graduates as educated men, but as true gentle- 
men. From a trial of twelve years in this Academy, the militarj' 
discipline has been found to produce the best effect upon the general 
deportment, health and scholarship of the Cadets. From no other 
system has the Commandant seen so good results in the general im- 
prevement of young men. 

Absence. — As absence from a single recitation interferes with 
the student's progress and is prejudicial to the school in many re- 
spects, no Cadet will be allowed to leave the institution during the 
time of school duty, except in cases which the judgment of the 
Commandant shall determine to be absolutely necessary. The 
teachers will be most happy to have parents visit the Academy at 
any time, and see its workings, provided they do not take their sons 
from recitations and necessary study hours. The students are free 
from study and recitations on Saturdays. 

Morals.— No Cadet will be retained in the Academy whose 
influence over his associates is known to be bad. The Commandant 
desires no one to enter who does not intend to be a gentleman ; and 
no one who has been expelled from another school for a sufficient 
cause will be admitted to this. 

SUNDAY'S. — Cadets will be required to attend Church with the 
Commandant. All the Cadets will study and recite a Bible lesson 
on Sunday in the afternoon. 

Return to School. — At the end of vacations, signals will be 
given for roll calls, and it is a rule of the school that every cadet 
shall answer to these calls, and failure to do so will be regarded and 
punished as a high delinquency, unless the parent sends an excuse 
to the Commandant, in which case extra duty only will be required 
of the Cadet. Each class is divided into sections, according to the 
proficiency of cadets; and a short absence after vacations will often 
force a cadet into a lower section. 

Damages. — Every Cadet is required to report and make good 



1 8 IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY. 

all damage doue by him to bis aims and aecoutrements, as well as 
to the other projierty of the in.^titution. If necessary all the cadets 
will be assessed for damage done. 

Diet. — The Commaudaut is induced to say that the mess hali 
ever has been and ever will be furnished with abundance of plain, 
wholesome food, such as has constantly increased the weight and 
promoted the health of his Cadets. If" any cadet, for the sake of 
getting a box of eatables from home, or for other cause, represents 
that his diet is delicient in quantity or quality, it is simply a false 
representation The Commandaiit requests that no boxes of food be 
sent to cadets, as they are often siek immediately after the receipt of 
sucli boxes. Ripe fruit is not objectionable, but* its expense, when 
sent from home, is more than when obtained here, on account of 
expressage. 

Parents and Guardians will please deposit all spending moneys 
with the Commandant, so that cadets will receive spending money 
only through him, and no other, while subject to the regulations of 
the institution. This rule must be strictly comj^lied ivith. 

Cadets will incur no debts without distinct permission from the 
Commandant. 

The fact of parents sending their sons to this Academj'^ shall be 
considered an order to furnish them with and keep in order the arti- 
cles required in this catalogue. 

Drafts will be forwarded for all bills not paid within five days 
after the 6th of September and the 2nd of January. 

Report of the scholarshij) and deportment of the cadets is pre- 
pared for the Parents and Guardians three times a year, also for 
parlor, library and dining room manners. 

Cadets received at any time and charged from date of entrance, 
from the age of 9 to 20. 

For further information address, 

IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY, 



REFERENCES. 

GEXL ROBT. C. SCHENCK, Washington, D. C. 
GEN'L CHETLAIX, Chicago, 111. 
Col. BOWEN, Chicago, III. 
Hon. J. V. FARWELL. Chicago. 111. 
Hon. S. H. KERFOOT, Lake View, 111. 
*Dr. L. C. STARKE L, Belleville. 111. 
Capt. E. J. WHITEHEAD, Chicago, III. 
Dr. J. P. MILLS, Chicago, 111. 
Hon. GEO. B. HARLOW, Springfleld, III. 
Rev. E. MANFORD, Chicago, III. 
Rev. D. M. THOMPKINS, Ravenswood, III. 
Rev. J. STRAUB, Marsailles, 111. 
Capt. J. R. HAYDEN, Olympia, W. T. 
Dr. RO.SWELL PARK, Chicago, 111. 
Rev. Dr. SURBRIDGE, Chicago, 111. 
J AS. P. BREWS I'ER, Chicago, III. 
Rev. S. SNYDER. San Francisco, Cal. 
Rev. ALBERT HALE, Springfield, III. 
Rev. C. A. OBENSCHAIN, Atlanta. 111. 
Rev. E. A. LEAPER, Oberlin, Ohio. 
J. W. HOOPER, Esq., Lake View, 111. 
J.S. BIRKELAND, Esq., Lake View, 111. 
H. T. HOLCO.MB, Esq., Irving Park, III. 
DAVID BURR, Esq , Lake City. Col. 
MARTIN E.HUYCK,E.sq. Denver, Col 



irving military academy. 19 

References Continued. 

*IVIai. D. V. DERRICKSON, Meaclville, Pa. 
FllED. KNUBBE, Esq., Michigan City, lud. 
J. G. OLIVER, Esq., Michigan City, Ind. 
JAS. NORMAN. Esq., Brooklvu, N. Y. 
H. L. FENTON, Esq., Detroit, Mich. 
CHAS. P. SHOEMAKER, Esq., Jackson, Mich. 
*G. A. GARRETTSON. Esq., Muscatine, Iowa. 
I. W. BANGS, Esq., Chicago, 111. 
*WM. NOSWORTIIY, Esq., Michigan C;ity, Ind. 
*J. H. CHAMBERS, Esq., St. Louis, Mo. 
*C. H. S.AGER, Esq., Lebanon, III. 
A. GREEN. Esq., St. Louis. Mo. 
.1. D. CLAPP, Esq.. Ft. Atkinson, Wis. 
Sy,UlRE DINGEE, Esq., Ravenswood, 111. 
*W. H. MIT<;HELL, Esq., Freeport, III. 
*ISAAC STINE, Esq., Freeport, 111. 
*J. H. SNYDER, Esq.. Freeport, 111. 
*Dr. W. H. LAUEFFERT. Belleville, 111. 
*WM. NICHOLS, Esq., Lebanon, 111. 
*Mrs. E. O. WESTFIELD, Lebanon, 111. 
*AL)DISON PYLE, Esq.. Lebanon, 111. 
*MARQ,UARD FORSTER, E.sq., St. Louis. 
\V. L. SIMMONS, Esq., Sandwich, 111. 
*F. NOHL, Esq., St. Louis, Mo. 
A. RUSSEL. Esq., Chicago, 111. 
*J. S. GATES, Esq.. Freeport, III 

*FERDINAND HEIM, Esq., E. St. Louis, 111. 
''Mrs. E. F. ROGERS, Grand Detour, 111. 
*L. ANDRUS, Esq.. Chicago, 111. 

JOHN TURNER, Esq., Lake View, 111. 

SAMUEL BRONVN. Esq., Ravenswood, 111. 
J. D. PERKINS, Esq., Ravenswood, 111. 

LOITIS SEMPER, Esq., Ravenswood, 111. 
J. R. HILL. Esq., Three Oaks, Mich. 

CHAUNCY' WILMOTT. Esq., Groton, N. Y. 
JOHN STACK, Esq.. New Haven. Conn 
MY'RON COMSTOCK, Esq., Groton. N. Y. 
*J. D. HERRICK, Esq., Chicago, 111. 
WM. SMITH, Esq., Poolville, N. Y. 
* Patrons. 

TESTIMONIALS. 

Belleville, III., July 6th, 1877. 

It aflfords me great pleasure in recommending the Irving Military Academy 
to Parents and Guardians as a first class Institution of learning for boys. The 
location of the Institution and the conveniences are excellent; Capt. J. C. Hill, 
Military Commandant of the Academy, is a strict and impartial disciplinarian, 
and worthy, the confidence of all who may entrust their boys to his care. 

My son has been a pupil of said Academy for the past year, and I will be 

pleased to return him at the close of vacation. 

DR. LOUIS C. STARKEL. 



Office of F. NoHL, Real Estate Agent, 

407 Walnut St., St. Louis, Mo., July, 1877. 
Having two boys at the I. M. A. for the past year, I do hereby take occasion, 
having visited the Institution and knowing its officers, and the way it is carried 
on, to recommend the same to parents and guardian^s, lor the Education and 

Training le.Kcuse expression) of boys. 

Very Respectfully, 

F. NOHL. 

Muscatine, Iowa, June 26th, 1S77. 
Captain J. C. Hill, Chicago. 

i>ear6^ir.— I can truly say that I am well pleased with my son's progress 
during the past two years, and expect to have him continue his studies next year 
To all parents wishing the advantage of a first class Academy, I can promise 
them satisfaction at Irving Military Academj'. 

Yours Truly, 

G. A. GARRETTSON, 

Pres't Muscatine National Bank 



IRVING MILITARY ACADEMY. 



CHU'Afio, July h. I87fi. 
I take pleasure in being able to say to parents, who, like myself, have felt 
and now feel the necessity of a first class school in our immediate vicinity, for 
the education of our boys, that Capt. J. Claude Hill, who is now connected with 
the Irving Military Academy, at Lake View, 111., (near Chicago) is highly qualified 
for the responsibilities of such an Institution, and is the best man for the position 
I know of, having my sou under his immediate care and discipline for the past 
year in a similar Institution, and knowing his former success, enables nic to 
speak with confidence of his ability to conduct an Institution of a high order. 

J. P. BREWSTER. 



Chicago, July, 7, 1876. 
Office of Harrison & Whitehead, Attorneys. 
I am pleased to say that I have been acquainted with Capt. J. Claude Hill, 
for several years, and knowing his success as an accomplished drill master and 
disciplinarian, I am confident tliat the Irving Military Academy, which he has 
now connected himself with, will prove a permanent success. No better point 
can be found for a first class Academy than at Lake View. 

E. J. WHITEHEAD. 



Lebanon, II!., June 14th, 1878. 
Capt. J. Claude Hill. 

Dear .Sir.— Clay arrived home safely, and we were glad to see such improve- 
ment. I am under lasting obligations to you for what you have done for my son. 

With many kind wishes, 

Yours Truly, 

MRS. KATE PY'LE. 



June 28th, IS7S. 
Capt. J. Claude Hill. 

Dear Sir: — Having visited your .Academy, I can cheerfuUj' reccommend it as 
.just the place to develop boys phj'sically and mentally and fit them for the 
duties of life. 

Will be pleased to have my son with j^ou another year. 
Y'ours Respectfully, 

J. D. CL.APP, Esq., 

President First National Bank, 

Fort .Atkinson, Wis. 



Grand Detour, 111., June 24th, 1878. 
Capt. Hill: — I am pleased with my son's improvement, and am anxious to 



send him to you another year. 



Respectfully, 

MRS. E. F. ROGERS. 



The above are only a few of the many letters sent us. 



Chk-ig@ iii I@rth-Wiitiii 



Depot Cor. Wells and Kinzie Streets. 

RAIL ROAD TIME TABLE. 

Lf-ave Chicago at 8:00 A. M., 11:00 A. M., 5:00 P. M., and 6:20 
P. M. Leave Academy Station (Belle Plain) at 6:30 A. M., 9:00 A. 
M., 2:00 P. M., and 6:46 P. M. 









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